options for help

where you can turn for advice and support

there is help and there is hope

3 places to find help on campus…

talk with a person you trust

Talk with a parent, medical doctor, religious leader, trusted professor, coach, RA, or friend. They can help you find the best and most appropriate place for getting help or a professional that you feel comfortable with.

visit the counseling center

Almost every college has a counseling center and every high school a guidance counselor. Visit your counseling center. You can usually call ahead and make an appointment or just stop by.

go to the health clinic

Talk to any doctor. They can help you find the help you need.

3 places to find help in the community…

seek help off campus

Some people don’t feel comfortable getting help on campus where they might be seen by others. Google “mental health services in [your city’s name]” for off-campus options. For more information on local services, look up your state in the SAMHSA Mental Health Services Locator or check out the Find a Pro service from the Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance to help you find peer recommended mental health resources.

check out support groups

Sharing and hearing from others going through similar problems can really help. See what support groups are available on campus or at local hospitals, community centers, or faith centers.

get in touch with a MHA or NAMI affiliate

These groups can provide you with information on mental health resources available in your community. Find your local Mental Health America or National Alliance on Mental Illness affiliate.

about Active Minds campus chapters

Find out if your college or high school has an Active Minds chapter. There are more than 450 chapters throughout the U.S. and internationally. If there’s not one on your campus, consider starting a chapter!

Many chapters have regular meetings where they work to plan mental health awareness and education events for their peers. The meetings often become a reminder to help each other prioritize self care. Active Minds chapters do not serve as peer support groups, but chapters do often become support networks for members, creating a place where student advocates know that others may share similar experiences.

Each chapter is closely tied to its campus health and counseling services.